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P1180702 copy.jpg

Surfridge


Breathing life back into the artifacts that exist
in the perimeter of our spatial & historical awareness.

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Surfridge


Breathing life back into the artifacts that exist
in the perimeter of our spatial & historical awareness.

Research & Documentation

Historical Research

Beginning in 1921, the bluff located south of Playa del Rey was developed as the town of Surfridge. Just to the east of the coastal town, a small airport called Mines Field opened. After building the streets atop of the sand dunes, custom homes were developed across the area which became one of the most exclusive residential areas in Southern California. The emerging neighborhood of Surfridge was initially described as “a playground for the wealthy.” Prior to 1945 it was only wealthy caucasians who were allowed in Surfridge. The once small airport became what we know today as the Los Angeles International Airport (L.A.X.). Beginning in the late 1960’s, after the advent of the jet airplane, a great deal of the neighborhood became condemned due to increasing airport noise pollution.

Rusty fire hydrants, broken lampposts, and driveways that lead to nowhere is all that remains of Surfridge. Today, Surfridge is the most exclusive and prohibited ghost town in the Los Angeles area.

 

My Response

After further research and extensive documentation of the site (selected images shown here): I began to experiment with my own interpretation of the space by using the silhouette of the original homes of Surfridge to serve as a container for found artifacts. From these images I created a series of posters (shown below). 
I experimented with the action of decay and layering as a method for bringing the past and present together. 

My goal was to show the potential the restricted area has in communicating historical narratives; such as the way in which this wealthy town lost its value due to the technological innovation of the jet airplanes.